Muslims heed calls to avoid holy site over Israeli security steps

18.07.2017

Muslims heeded calls Monday not to enter a Jerusalem holy site and protested outside after Israeli authorities installed metal detectors at entrances to the ultra-sensitive compound following an attack that killed two policemen.

The compound was largely empty apart from tourists and Jewish visitors, with Muslims again praying and protesting outside the site instead of entering through the metal detectors.

The Haram al-Sharif compound, known to Jews as the Temple Mount, includes the Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa mosque.

Several hundred people could be seen praying outside two different entrances to the site on Monday.

There were protests after the prayer, with crowds shouting: "Aqsa mosque, we sacrifice our souls and our blood."

Police later sought to move them back.

"We will not break the solidarity of the people," said Jamal Abdallah, a Palestinian who now lives in the US state of Arizona and was planning to visit Al-Aqsa but changed his mind when he was made aware of the situation.

In the evening, several dozen Palestinians blocked a road near the Old City. Israeli officers dispersed the protesters, who hurled stones and other objects, police said.

Palestinian medical sources said 11 people were treated for rubber bullet injuries and dozens of others for tear gas inhalation.

Israel installed the metal detectors after Friday's attack near the holy site that saw three Arab Israelis open fire on Israeli police.

They then fled to the compound, where they were shot dead by security forces.

It was among the most serious incidents in Jerusalem in recent years and heightened Israeli-Palestinian tensions.

Israel took the highly unusual decision of closing the compound for the weekly Friday prayers, triggering anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian.

The site remained closed on Saturday, and parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown.

Israeli authorities said the closure was necessary to carry out security checks, adding that the assailants had come from within the holy site to commit the attack.

They began reopening it on Sunday, but with metal detectors in place, while security cameras were also being installed in the area.

Al-Aqsa officials have refused to enter and have called on worshippers to do the same.

Palestinians view the new measures as Israel asserting further control over the site.

Crowds chanted "Allahu Akbar" (God is Greatest) as they gathered near the Lions Gate entrance to Jerusalem's Old City on Sunday. (AFP)

More about the Israeli–Palestinian conflict on Qantara.de

In submitting this comment, the reader accepts the following terms and conditions: Qantara.de reserves the right to edit or delete comments or not to publish them. This applies in particular to defamatory, racist, personal, or irrelevant comments or comments written in dialects or languages other than English. Comments submitted by readers using fantasy names or intentionally false names will not be published. Qantara.de will not provide information on the telephone. Readers' comments can be found by Google and other search engines.