Dossier: Algeria

Yasmina Khadra (photo: Getty Images)

Interview with Yasmina Khadra

"The Algerian regime is pulling all the strings"

The renowned Algerian writer, Mohammed Moulessehoul, who goes by his pen name Yasmina Khadra, wanted to stand as an independent candidate for the presidency of Algeria. He funded his own campaign and criss-crossed the country seeking nomination. Unfortunately, he only managed to win the support of 43,000 people, 17,000 short of the minimum number needed to be able to contest the election. Regina Keil-Sagawe spoke to the author about his campaign and about the situation in AlgeriaMore

Algeria's President Abdelaziz Bouteflika (right) inspecting a military guard in Algiers (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Presidential election in Algeria

Out with the old, in with the old

On 17 April, Algeria goes to the polls to elect a new president. However, it seems as if the new president will be the old one: Abdelaziz Bouteflika. But even though the outcome seems like a foregone conclusion, political resistance is forming. By Kersten KnippMore

Boualem Sansal (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Boualem Sansal's essay on Islamisation

Fighting Islamists with conspiracy theories

Bitter disappointment at the outcome of the Arab Spring oozes from every page of "Allahs Narren. Wie der Islamismus die Welt erobert" (Allah's Fools. How Islamism is Conquering the World) by the Algerian writer and winner of the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade Boualem Sansal. Joseph Croitoru read the polemic workMore

Scene from "Al Oustadh" (copyright: Mahmoud Ben Mahmoud)

North Africa and the Arab Spring in Film

Between Rebellion and Ideals

North African countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, and Algeria are currently experiencing a boom in cinema that is critical of society and committed to political change. Yet, every country follows its own path. By Aude GensbittelMore

The border juncture between Libya and Algeria (© DW/Valerie Stocker)

Libya's Border Triangle

Trouble Looming

The EU is supporting Libyan border security troops near Ghadames, but local members of the military complain of unclear structures and insufficient equipment. They put the blame on the government in Tripoli. Valerie Stocker reportsMore

The Algerian Writer Boualem Sansal (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Interview with the Algerian Writer Boualem Sansal

"Take Islam back from the Islamists!"

Are Europe's democracies too weak to curb Islamism? Controversial Algerian writer Boualem Sansal sounds a warning. The time for political debate has passed, he tells Aya BachMore

Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika at the People's Palace in the capital Algiers on April 15, 2013 (photo: Farouk Batiche/AFP/Getty Images)

Algerian Paralysis

Bouteflika's Uncertain Future

The future of ailing Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has not been settled – and the nation's powerful figures are nervous. The country is still puzzling over the question of who might succeed him. By Christoph ErhardtMore

The Algerian Novelist Yasmina Khadra (photo: Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

Interview with the Algerian Novelist Yasmina Khadra

"There Is a Life after Defeat"

Now based in France, the Algerian writer Yasmina Khadra is one of his country's most successful authors. The film The Attack, based on Yasmina Khadra's book of the same name, was honoured as Best International Literary Adaptation at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair. Regina Keil-Sagawe joined the novelist for an espressoMore

The Pan-Arab Youth Orchestra in concert in Berlin (photo: Kai Bienert/Young Euro Classic)

Pan-Arab Youth Orchestra

Music to Combat Hopelessness

The world's only pan-Arab youth orchestra met in Berlin to make music together. But the young musicians also discussed the situation in their home countries – politics, hopes and fears. Peter Zimmermann reportsMore

Portest against the economic crisis in Tunis (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Tunisia's Economic Crisis

The Decline of the Middle Class

More than two years have passed since the start of the so-called "Arab Spring" in Tunisia. What began as a fight for social justice became an ideological tug-of-war between Islamists and secular forces. But while the elite engage in theoretical debate, the economic crisis deepens. Katharina Pfannkuch reportsMore

A French fighter jet of the type 'Mirage' in Bamako, Mali (photo: Reuters)

Consequences of the Military Intervention in Mali

A Tinderbox Situation

Algeria and Morocco granted France permission to use their airspace in its campaign against militant Islamists in Mali. But Arab experts fear that the Mali intervention could push many young Muslims into the arms of the Jihadists. By Siham OuchtouMore

Dalila Dalléas Bouzar's 'Les enfants du soleil – children of the sun', Pencil and acryl on paper (courtesy: Dalila Dalléas Bouzar)

The Franco-Algerian artist Dalila Dalléas Bouzar

Pulling away the Veil from Memory

In her project "Algeria, Year Zero – the pieced together past of the future", Berlin-based Franco-Algerian artist Dalila Dalléas Bouzar focused on the collective traumas experienced by Algerian society. Martina Sabra spoke with the artist in BerlinMore

Israeli Rabbi Maimoun, 67, from Tel Aviv and born in Tunis, reads the Torah in the Ghriba Synagogue on April 29, 2010 on the eve of the Jewish annual pilgrimage in Djerba (photo: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

Jewish Life in North Africa

Facing a Precarious Future

The once-large Jewish communities in Tunisia and Egypt have almost disappeared. Those who remain are treated with mistrust and suspicion by society. The Arab Spring has made their situation even more difficult. Andreas Gorzewski reportsMore

Boualem Sansal (photo: dpa)

Boualem Sansal on Arab-Islamic Identity

The Islamists Will Govern Undemocratically

The Arab revolutionary states are experiencing a dangerous association between Islamism and nationalism, fears Boualem Sansal, who is calling for the formation of a Mediterranean unionMore

ALN soldiers in 1960 (photo: dpa)

Literature and Collective Trauma in Algeria

Moving Beyond the Examination of History

Perception of Algerian literature is dominated by the complex thematic backdrop of violence and the processing of traumatic experience. What are the reasons for this? In a piece to mark the 50th anniversary of Algerian independence, Martina Sabra debates this issueMore

Anti-government protests in Algeria (photo: dpa)

Algeria and the Arab Spring

Opting for the Status Quo Rather than Experimentation

In spite of strikes and protest campaigns, until now there have been no uprisings in Algeria comparable to those in other Arab states. The fact that a large percentage of the population consists of young people who are unhappy with the government is still not an adequate prerequisite for mass protest, writes Sigrid Faath in her analysisMore

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