Dossier: Arab Spring

Women in Libya

High hopes brutally dashed

The 2011 revolution raised Libyan women's hopes that they could in future play a more active role in society and politics, leading to the establishment of many women's rights groups. However, the militias' power games and ongoing violence are putting the progress achieved thus far at risk. By Valerie StockerMore

Inside the El Ghriba synagogue in Tunisia (photo: dpa)

The Jewish community in Tunisia

"Everything is ok; we don't have any problems"

Once numbering over one hundred thousand, Tunisia's Jewish community has dwindled over the years. Its members practice discretion, but certainly have no desire to hide. By Sarah Mersch in TunisiaMore

Morocco's King Mohammed VI (centre) with his son and heir, Prince Moulay Hassan (left), and his brother Prince Moulay Rachid (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Democratic change in Morocco

The right king in the wrong monarchy?

The paradox of the political situation in Morocco is that King Mohammed VI seems to want to bring about domestic political change, whereas his entourage, which has grown rich and influential since the country gained independence, is resisting such efforts. By Mohammed HashasMore

Karama co-ordination meeting in Cairo on 7 October 2011 on the occasion of the establishment of the Libyan Women's Platform for Peace (photo: Dominique Margot)

Women's movements in the transitioning Arab states

For dignity, peace and equal rights

Despite all the setbacks suffered by many women's rights groups in the transitioning Arab states, regional co-operation has improved considerably over the past few years. Juliane Metzker takes stockMore

Joumana Haddad (photo: Ceyda Nurtsch)

Interview with Joumana Haddad

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"I don't believe in female solidarity"

The Lebanese journalist and writer Joumana Haddad is considered one of the most courageous women's rights activists in the Arab world. In this interview with Ceyda Nurtsch, she talks about the erotic magazine "Jasad", feminist stereotypes and why the "Arab Spring" was just another winterMore

Portraits of the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad (photo: DW)

Syria and the Ba'ath regime

Assad and the post-eternity era

Assad and no other. Assad is no one. He is a nebulous being soaked in blood and trampling on corpses, a man who claims to be president of a republic that no longer exists, writes Elias Khoury in his essayMore

Pro-Assad election posters in Damascus (photo: Reuters)

Presidential election in Syria

No Holds Barred

Syria's President Bashar al-Assad intends to have himself confirmed in office for a further seven years in early June. The regime's propaganda machinery is running flat out in advance of the election. Since the beginning of the revolution, the Syrian powers-that-be have been working hard to turn both domestic and international public opinion in their favour. By Martina SabraMore

Ala'a Shehabi (photo: Ala'a Shehabi)

The Bahraini activist Ala'a Shehabi

David versus goliath

The Bahraini economist Ala'a Shehabi has taken up the fight for democracy in her native country. In light of the fact that the repression of activists has increased here over the past three years and that the regime is spending millions on PR, hers is set to be a long, uphill struggle. By Iris MostegelMore

Ceremony marking the closure of the National Dialogue Conference in Yemen with President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi (right) (photo: Reuters)

Federalism and state-building in Yemen

Between transition and stagnation

With the conclusion of the National Dialogue Conference and the decision to introduce a federal system, Yemen would appear to be moving forward in its transition process, paving the way for a new constitution and democratic elections. However, things in the country are not as rosy as they might seem at first glance. By Marie-Christine HeinzeMore

German pianist Davide Martello is surrounded by anti-government protesters as he performs in Istanbul's Taksim Square on 13 June 2013 (photo: Reuters)

Tahrir and Taksim – Part II

Soundtrack of two revolutions

Tahrir and Taksim: two squares, one new culture of protest? In the second part of this two-part report, Amin Farzanefar looks at the how street art, music and film became essential parts of the new protest cultureMore

Sihem Bensedrine (photo: DW)

Interview with the human rights activist Sihem Bensedrine

Tunisia's democratic awakening under threat

The well-known Tunisian human rights activist Sihem Bensedrine talks to Moncef Slimi about the arduous process of democratic transformation in the motherland of the Arab SpringMore

Mohammed Badie, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, waves from inside the defendants' cage during the trial of brotherhood members in February 2014 (photo: Ahmed Gamil/AFP/Getty Images)

More mass death sentences in Egypt

The breakdown of Egypt's legal system

Instead of demonstrating its professionalism and independence and upholding the rule of law, Egypt's judiciary is compromising itself by playing the role of an angel of vengeance, handing down merciless punishments to members of the Muslim Brotherhood in fast-track mass trials. The breakdown of the country's legal system is a disaster that will eventually cost all Egyptians dear, says Karim El-Gawhary in CairoMore

A poster of Abdul Fattah al-Sisi seen in central Cairo. It reads "Sisi, son of Egypt. You are free. Son of freedom" (photo: Reuters)

Terrorism and repression in the Arab world

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On Islam, anti-terrorism and fascism

One of the reasons why there is little outcry over the repression practised by secular governments in the Arab world is that there is a lack of empathy for those who are affected by it, writes Charlotte WiedemannMore

Syrian opposition figure Michel Kilo in Istanbul (photo: Ozen Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Syrian opposition groups

Time to join forces

The well-known Syrian opposition figure and journalist Michel Kilo believes that only a national alliance of all rebel groups can break the terrorism perpetrated by the organisation Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) and the Assad regimeMore

Algeria's President Abdelaziz Bouteflika (right) inspecting a military guard in Algiers (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Presidential election in Algeria

Out with the old, in with the old

On 17 April, Algeria goes to the polls to elect a new president. However, it seems as if the new president will be the old one: Abdelaziz Bouteflika. But even though the outcome seems like a foregone conclusion, political resistance is forming. By Kersten KnippMore

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (right) speaking to Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal inside 10 Downing Street, London, England on 22 March 2011 (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK

Has Cameron buckled to pressure from Middle East allies?

During his announcement last week that he had ordered a review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK, British Prime Minister David Cameron made several references to violent extremism. Over the past two decades, Britain has introduced a whole raft of anti-terror laws that can be used in cases of violent extremism, so why is it necessary at this point in time to conduct a review into the Muslim Brotherhood? By Susannah TarbushMore

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