Dossier: Egypt Revolution 2011

Mansoura Ez-Eldin (photo: Arian Fariborz)

Interview with the Egyptian author Mansoura Ez-Eldin

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"The current situation is untenable"

For the renowned Egyptian journalist and writer Mansoura Ez-Eldin, the revolution of 2011 provided literary fodder for essays, short stories and now a new novel. Arian Fariborz spoke with her in CairoMore

Shocked relatives react after learning of the death sentences passed on 529 supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Mass death sentences against the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt

Egypt's future at risk

Earlier this week, an Egyptian court sentenced over 500 Muslim Brotherhood supporters to death in a case that lasted less than two days. According to Loay Mudhoon, this ruling is the work of a politicised judiciary and could destroy any chance of national reconciliationMore

Bassem Youssef (photo: Getty Images/AFP/Karim Sahib)

TV Satirist Bassem Youssef

"People should be able to listen to different opinions"

The political satire show "AlBernameg" attracted millions of Arab viewers each week before it was suddenly cancelled in November 2013. On Friday 7 February 2014, it returned to Egyptian TV screens on MBC Egypt. Jaafar Abdul-Karim and Khalid El Kaoutit spoke to its host and star, Bassem YoussefMore

Serious rioting on Tahrir Square in Cairo (photo: Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

The political consequences of the Arab Spring

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Some revolts just take longer

Civil war in Syria, a military regime in Egypt ... at first glance, it seems as if the Arab Spring has gone off the rails. But the battle is not over yet: 2014 will be a decisive year for change in the Arab world. An essay by Karim El-GawharyMore

Empty aisles and stands at the Cairo International Book Fair 2014 (photo: Amira El Ahl)

Cairo International Book Fair 2014

Reader, where art thou?

Many Egyptians are avoiding this year's Cairo International Book Fair for fear of new outbreaks of violence or terrorist attacks. Publishers are complaining about intolerable conditions and a lack of planning. By Amira El Ahl in CairoMore

Supporters of General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on Tahrir Square in Cairo on the third anniversary of the revolution (photo: Reuters)

The political mood in Egypt

Between a rock and a hard place

The poor turnout in the constitutional referendum last week shows that the democratic spirit that fuelled the popular uprising in Egypt in 2011 is now flagging. Writer and journalist Mansoura Ez-Eldin describes the current moodMore

A demonstrator and opponent of the new government in Cairo prepares to throw a Molotov cocktail at security forces in Cairo (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Three years after the Arab uprisings

Tyranny has gone unpunished

The revolutions that swept across the Arab world in 2011 could have failed for any number of reasons. However, the fact that their consequences now threaten to drag entire nations into chaos and rehabilitate tyrannous rulers three years after they were unceremoniously ousted is almost worse than if there had been no uprisings in the first place. By Günther OrthMore

Still from the film "Freedom Bus" (photo: dropoutcinema)

Documentary film: "Freedom Bus"

On the rocky road to democracy

In 2011, the German-Iranian film director Fatima Geza Abdollahyan followed the "Freedom Bus" on its tour of Egypt. Along the way, she experienced many of the difficulties the campaign encountered in its attempts to raise awareness of the principles of democracy. Nevertheless, the resulting film makes compelling viewing. By Maha El NabawiMore

Egypt's constituent assembly approves the country's new constitution (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Egypt's Political Outlook

In Need of a Culture of Compromise

The biggest challenge facing Egypt in its attempts to build a new future is the fact that it does not have a political culture of compromise, writes Ronald MeinardusMore

Demonstration in commemoration of the Egyptian activist Gaber Salah, Kairo (photo: dpa)

Protestes in Egypt

Army Opponents Break Their Silence

Egypt's Islamists demonstrated for months against the army. Now, secular activists are out in the streets to protest the co-opting of their revolution. But, the military government has a propaganda machine on its side. By Markus Symank from CairoMore

Memorial for the unknown soldier in Ankara, Turkish flags in the background (photo: Tarik Tinazay/dpa)

Turkey's Foreign Policy

Return to Pragmatism

In the past month Ankara opened a membership chapter with the European Union after a 30-month hiatus, while intense diplomatic traffic is underway to end tensions with its Iranian and Iraqi neighbours. All of which is fuelling rising speculation that a major reset in Turkish foreign policy is underway. Dorian Jones looks at what lies behind the latest eventsMore

With a dramatic sunset backdrop illumating the scene from behind, a protestor stands on a ledge above his friends and waves the red, white and black Egyptian flag through the sunlight (photo: REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany)

The Arab Spring in Historical Perspective

Revolutions Take Time

Analysts have gleefully declared the Arab Spring to have failed. What they don't understand however, is that fundamental societal changes don't occur over night. In her essay, Ingrid Thurner pleads for more time for the Arab SpringMore

US-President Barack Obama meets Saudi King Abdullah in Washington DC (photo: Roger L. Wollenberg/EPA)

Saudi Arabia and America

The Estrangement of Two Allies

Saudi Arabia feels as though it has been left in the lurch by the US. Primary thorns in the Saudis' side are Washington's energy policy, its rapprochement with Iran and its conduct in the Syrian conflict. Riyadh is now going its own way. By Rainer HermannMore

Mass demonstration on Tahrir Square (photo: Reuters)

Revolutionary Films in the Arab World

Taking Stock

What is the significance of film during and after revolutions? In recent years, many films have been made in Egypt and Tunisia, although the viewpoints of the filmmakers could hardly be more different. By Irit NeidhardtMore

Mansoura Ez-Eldin (photo: Mansoura Ez-Eldin)

The Democratic Process in Egypt

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The Success of Democracy is Not a Question of Education

Although she recognises the dangers inherent in an uneducated society, Egyptian author Mansoura Ez-Eldin disputes the political belief that it takes a learned population to create a democracy. The problem is more a fundamental lack of political education and a poor understanding of democratic principles at all levelsMore

A Syrian refugee mother with her two children (photo: Reuters)

Syrian Refugees

Driven out of Egypt

The Egyptian authorities are taking a very heavy-handed line against refugees from the Syrian civil war. Amnesty International says Cairo is forcing those who have fled the violence and entered Egypt to leave the country again, thereby pushing them into a highly uncertain future. Andreas Gorzewski reportsMore

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