Dossier: Gender

KAFA demonstration on International Women's Day on 8 March in Beirut (photo: Juliane Metzker)

Domestic violence against women in Lebanon

Protection, yes, but not enough

On 1 April, the Lebanese parliament approved a law designed to curb domestic violence. However, the women's rights organisation KAFA, which ran a high-profile campaign demanding a law to protect women against domestic violence, is disappointed with the outcome and says the law does not go far enough. Background information from Juliane Metzker in BeirutMore

A girl holds up a poster of Amina al-Filali, victim of rape and forced marriage in Morocco (photo: Naqi Tbel)

Women in Morocco

Rape victims no longer forced to marry their aggressors

Although Morocco has done away with a controversial law allowing rapists of underage girls to escape prosecution if they marry their victims, the basic problem of rape remains. Activists say it's time to enact change in society to protect rape victims. By Monika GriebelerMore

Abdullah Hamidaddin wearing his daughter's abaya (photo: Abdullah Hamidaddin)

The hijab

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Power and the headscarf

Abdullah Hamidaddin, a writer and commentator on religion and the Middle East, wore his daughter's hijab to remind people that the hijab was originally an expression of power, and to point out that if women had ruled, things might have been very differentMore

Pastor Rola Sleiman in her church in Tripoli (photo: DW/A. Williams)

Lebanon's first female pastor

"The fact that I am a woman was never a problem"

In Lebanon's northern city of Tripoli, an Evangelical community has decided to break with tradition and elect a woman as their pastor. The small parish has come to appreciate Rola Sleiman in trying times. By Andreane Williams in TripoliMore

Dr. Elham Manea (photo: private copyright)

Women in Saudi Arabia

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Caught in a System of Gender Apartheid

No professional or vocational training, no visits to the doctor, no lawsuits without male approval. The Yemeni-Swiss political scientist Elham Manea describes the plight of women in Saudi ArabiaMore

Roman Paul (photo: © DW/Bernd Sobolla)

Saudi Arabia's First Feature Film "Wadjda"

"It's Not Just about Suppression"

"Wadjda" is the first feature film ever made in Saudi Arabia. One of its German producers tells Bernd Sobolla about the daring women involved, and how his own perception of Saudi Arabia changed in the processMore

An Afghan woman in Kabul (photo: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Forced Marriage in Afghanistan

Suicide as a Final Resort

Up to 80 per cent of marriages in Afghanistan take place without the consent of the bride, who is often a minor. Many of these brides – particularly those who live in cities – see killing themselves as the only way out. Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi reports on this tragic state of affairsMore

Femen campaign 'Topless Jihad Day' (photo: picture-alliance/abaca)

Women Muslims Outraged by Femen Action

Exposing Misunderstandings

With their "Topless Jihad Day", Femen activists wanted to demonstrate for the rights of Muslim women. The problem is that Muslim women see no need for protest. "Nudity does not free us" was their answer in an online campaign. Femen activists, in turn, diagnose Muslim women as suffering from Stockholm syndrome. By Nadia PantelMore

Logo of Muslim taxi (image: muslimtaxi.de)

Germany's First Muslim Car Sharing Service

''We Are Protecting Marriages''

Selim Reid set up Germany's first Muslim car sharing service to spare his mother disparaging remarks and to reduce the number of extra-marital affairs. Cigdem Akyol spoke to the entrepreneur about his concept and his motivationMore

Shereen El Feki (photo: Kristof Arasim)

Shereen El Feki's ''Sex and the Citadel''

Exploring a Sexual Minefield

Journalist Shereen El Feki feels that the taboo surrounding all subjects relating to sexuality in public discourse in the Arab world is not only an ideological deficit, but also dangerous, due to what she sees as a shocking lack of knowledge across the board. Claudia Kramatschek read her bookMore

Tunisian protesters hold slogans during a demonstration to protest over the violence against women in Tunis, Tunisia on September 29, 2012, in support of a woman who was raped by two policemen (photo: picture alliance/abaca)

Commentary by Moha Ennaji

Arab Women's Unfinished Revolution

Though women across the Middle East participated actively in the Arab Spring protests that began in late 2010, they remain second-class citizens, even where popular uprisings managed to topple autocratic regimes. A Commentary by Moha EnnajiMore

Egyptian women shout slogans against the President Mohamed Morsi decree, at Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, 27 November 2012 (photo: dpa)

A Backlash of Patriarchy in Egypt

Hope for a Proper Revolution

The targeting of women in the Egyptian revolution – to make them know "their place" – was among the first shots fired by the counter-revolution. Yet they fight on. A viewpoint by Margot BadranMore

Amina Wadud (photo: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images)

Interview with Amina Wadud

''Islam Belongs to All Its Believers''

Amina Wadud is an American scholar of Islam with a progressive focus on Koran exegesis. In 2005, she led Friday prayers in the US, which not only broke with tradition, it also triggered debate and Muslim juristic discourse on the issue of female imams. Interview by Abderrahmane AmmarMore

A general view shows, members of the Shoura Council during a meeting, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 25 September 2011 (photo: dpa)

Women in Saudi Arabia

Breaking Barriers

With the recent appointment of women to the Saudi Shura Council, journalist Maha Akeel delves into the growing advancements of women in Saudi ArabiaMore

Logo The uprising of women in the Arab world

The Uprising of Women in the Arab World

Fighting Patriarchal Tyranny

The group "The uprising of women in the Arab world" is taking a courageous stand for gender equality. However, the activists face significant resistance: from old ways of thinking, patriarchal chauvinism – and even from Facebook. Laura Overmeyer reportsMore

Female activists demonstrate against President Morsi's extention of power in Cairo (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Female Rights and the Arab Spring

A Backward Leap for Women

Now, as the dust of the Arab Spring revolutions begins to settle, women – who stood shoulder to shoulder with men in defying tyranny – are finding themselves marginalized and excluded from decision-making. By Hoda BadranMore

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