Dossier: Human Rights

Dr. Mads Gilbert tends to a child in al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza, 2009 (photo Getty Images)

Interview with Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert

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"Nobody is safe in Gaza"

Professor of Medicine at the University of Tromso, Norway, Mads Gilbert is currently working at al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza. He has been volunteering in Gaza on and off for the last 17 years and recently submitted a report to the UN on the state of the health sector in Gaza. In this interview with Roma Rajpal Weiss, Gilbert describes the present situation at the hospital and in GazaMore

Ruined buildings in the Gaza Strip, 19 July 2014 (photo: DW/Shawgy el Farra)

Israeli military offensive in Gaza

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Israel cannot win

All those whose opinions differ from the prevailing view are considered saboteurs. In this guest commentary, the Israeli writer Etgar Keret describes how the thought police are dominating his homeland and explains why the problems Israel faces cannot simply be bombed awayMore

Memorial march in Tizi Ouzou marking the crushing of a peaceful protest in the Kabylie region in 1980 (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Ethnic conflict in Algeria

A struggle for power and recognition

Algeria's non-Arab minorities are up in arms. The ethnic conflict between Arabs and Berbers is weakening the already fragile stability of the Maghreb state. By Susanne KaiserMore

A street in Kabul (photo: DW)

Afghanistan after Hamid Karzai

Facing an uncertain future

In Afghanistan, people look with nostalgia upon outgoing President Hamid Karzai. But at the same time, they fear the uncertain future that his successor might very well bring. By Emran FerozMore

Raji Sourani. Photo: Tom Knutson/Right Livelihood Foundation

Interview with Raji Sourani in Gaza

"We are just soft targets: we are very cheap"

Raji Sourani is a human rights lawyer and founder of the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, which documents and investigates human rights violations in the Occupied Territories. Jailed on six occasions for his work, Sourani is staying put in Gaza at the moment, and continuing to work under siege. He tells Roma Rajpal Weiss that people there have lost all hopeMore

Activists attend a silent protest march against a recent rape case in Calcutta, India, 15 June 2013. Photo: EPA/Piyal Adhikary

India's rape problem

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New rape laws must be implemented

A series of brutal gang rapes in India has once again highlighted the rampant problem of violence against women in the country. Despite recent law reforms and harsher penalties, little is being done by the authorities to prevent crimes against women. By Roma Rajpal WeissMore

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo meets the people. Photo: Getty Images

Indonesian Presidential Elections 2014

Populist versus autocrat

The two candidates in the forthcoming presidential elections in Indonesia could hardly be more different. Prabowo Subianto, former son-in-law of the late dictator Suharto, has adopted a militaristic style, and likes to present himself as a strong leader, while social democrat candidate Joko Widodo is seen as a man of the people and establishment outsider. Christina Schott examines their chancesMore

Rohingya refugees from Myanmar. Photo: DW/Shaikh Azizur Rahman

The Muslim Rohingya in Myanmar

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In the shadow of an icon

Since 2012 there have been repeated violent clashes between Buddhists and Muslims in Myanmar. Human rights activists accuse the government and state security forces of ethnic cleansing, murder and persecution. Charlotte Wiedemann reports on the fate of the country's Muslim Rohingya peopleMore

A Myanmar Buddhist monk holds a sign as he takes part in a demonstration against the Organisation of the Islamic Conference in Yangon on 15 October 2012 (photo: Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar

The spectre of ethnic violence reappears

In the light of a recent series of bills proposed by the Myanmar government that seek to restrict an individual's right to religious freedom, critics fear a further increase in discrimination and violence against the marginalised community of Rohingya Muslims. By Roma Rajpal WeißMore

Prince Moulay Hicham el Alaoui (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Prince Moulay Hicham el Alaoui of Morocco

The diary of the red prince

The Moroccan Prince Moulay Hicham el Alaoui has penned a diary about his life in the palace and his exile, thereby creating a scandal in the royal household. Astrid Kaminski read the bookMore

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (photo: Reuters)

One year on from Rouhani's election victory

Surprise and disenchantment

A year on from his election victory, the Iranian president Hassan Rouhani has a success story to show for himself that barely anyone would have expected him to pull off: the breakthrough in the nuclear talks with the West. However, Iran's economic situation remains difficult and there have been few improvements in terms of freedom of speech and human rights. By Ulrich von SchwerinMore

Afghan workers in Iran (photo: Murtzeza Musawi/DW)

Afghan refugees in Iran

Treated like second-class citizens

Iran constantly draws attention to the plight of other peoples and minorities – whether it is the Palestinians in Gaza or the Shia in Saudi Arabia. Yet at the same time, the government in Tehran takes a hard line against minorities living in Iran. According to Emran Feroz, the largest group to suffer as a result of this policy is the Afghan refugeesMore

Karama co-ordination meeting in Cairo on 7 October 2011 on the occasion of the establishment of the Libyan Women's Platform for Peace (photo: Dominique Margot)

Women's movements in the transitioning Arab states

For dignity, peace and equal rights

Despite all the setbacks suffered by many women's rights groups in the transitioning Arab states, regional co-operation has improved considerably over the past few years. Juliane Metzker takes stockMore

Women protesting outside the parliament in Rabat on 17 March 2012 after the suicide of Amina Filali (photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Women's rights in Morocco

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Gender equality on paper only

Ever since a young woman took her own life two years ago after being raped and married off to her aggressor, equal rights between men and women have been the subject of heated discussion in Morocco. A set of laws that is riddled with contradictions further fuels the debate. By Susanne KaiserMore

Supporters of Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on 3 June 2014 in Cairo (photo: Reuters)

EU election monitors in Egypt

Alienating all sides

The EU wants it both ways: it would like to retain the moral upper hand as the cradle of democracy, while at the same time maintaining good links with Egypt's new leader, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi. A commentary by Karim El-GawharyMore

Ala'a Shehabi (photo: Ala'a Shehabi)

The Bahraini activist Ala'a Shehabi

David versus goliath

The Bahraini economist Ala'a Shehabi has taken up the fight for democracy in her native country. In light of the fact that the repression of activists has increased here over the past three years and that the regime is spending millions on PR, hers is set to be a long, uphill struggle. By Iris MostegelMore

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