Dossier: Muslim Brotherhood

Symbolic graffiti: relay runners from Libya, Egypt and Tunisia prepare to hand over the flame of freedom to Yemen and Syria (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Three years after the Arab Spring

Self-criticism and genuine dialogue required

Arab Islamists and secularists fought alongside each other in the Arab Spring revolutions. But once they had removed the hated despots from power, they became embroiled in political trench warfare and revealed an astonishing lack of democratic maturity, says renowned Moroccan analyst Ali AnouzlaMore

Gamal Eid (photo: picture-alliance)

Interview with the Egyptian human rights activist Gamal Eid

A warning shot for civil society

Egyptian security forces have seized the current edition the magazine "Wasla", which is published by the Arab Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI). In conversation with Abbas Al-Khashali, ANHRI Chairman Gamal Eid explains the potential political fallout of curtailing freedom of expression in EgyptMore

Supporters of Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on 3 June 2014 in Cairo (photo: Reuters)

EU election monitors in Egypt

Alienating all sides

The EU wants it both ways: it would like to retain the moral upper hand as the cradle of democracy, while at the same time maintaining good links with Egypt's new leader, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi. A commentary by Karim El-GawharyMore

Pro-Sisi and pro-Egypt products on sale in Cairo (photo: DW/B. Knight)

Presidential election in Egypt

No real choice

It is a foregone conclusion that Egypt's military ruler Abdul Fattah al-Sisi will win the first presidential election since the ousting of the Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in July 2013. Nevertheless, true democracy in the land on the Nile is still a long way off, writes Loay MudhoonMore

An election poster for Abdul Fattah al-Sisi in Cairo that reads "He is the one we can trust" (photo: SN/APA (DPA)/MICHAEL KAPPELER)

Presidential election in Egypt

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A nation marching in step

Anyone seen filming in Cairo these days should expect to be approached by an upright citizen demanding to see a permit and referring to the omnipresent threat of terrorism. On the eve of the presidential election in Egypt, fighting terrorism and not boosting the country's crippled economy seems to be right at the top of the political agenda. A commentary by Stefan Buchen in CairoMore

Abdul Fattah al-Sisi's image is omnipresent in the Cairo district of Gamaliya (photo: Markus Symank)

Presidential election in Egypt

In the heartland of the al-Sisi cult

The residents of Gamaliya in Cairo are extremely proud of their district's son, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi. Markus Symank visited the quarter where the former Egyptian army chief spent his formative years to get a feel for the man who is most likely to be Egypt's next head of stateMore

General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi (photo: Reuters)

The economic power of the Egyptian army

Everything under control

While poverty and unemployment rates in Egypt are on the rise, the country's generals live comfortably and the army's businesses are booming. In fact, since the revolution, the army has managed to consolidate its economic power – with the help of foreign countries seeking to influence domestic politics in Egypt. By Markus Symank in CairoMore

The Egyptian writer and feminist Nawal El Saadawi (photo: Arian Fariborz)

Interview with Nawal El Saadawi

"They don't want any really courageous people!"

The spirited Egyptian author and feminist Nawal El Saadawi is not afraid of castigating the hypocrisy of the political system and the continued violations of women's rights in her country. Arian Fariborz spoke to her in CairoMore

Mohammed Badie, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, waves from inside the defendants' cage during the trial of brotherhood members in February 2014 (photo: Ahmed Gamil/AFP/Getty Images)

More mass death sentences in Egypt

The breakdown of Egypt's legal system

Instead of demonstrating its professionalism and independence and upholding the rule of law, Egypt's judiciary is compromising itself by playing the role of an angel of vengeance, handing down merciless punishments to members of the Muslim Brotherhood in fast-track mass trials. The breakdown of the country's legal system is a disaster that will eventually cost all Egyptians dear, says Karim El-Gawhary in CairoMore

A poster of Abdul Fattah al-Sisi seen in central Cairo. It reads "Sisi, son of Egypt. You are free. Son of freedom" (photo: Reuters)

Terrorism and repression in the Arab world

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On Islam, anti-terrorism and fascism

One of the reasons why there is little outcry over the repression practised by secular governments in the Arab world is that there is a lack of empathy for those who are affected by it, writes Charlotte WiedemannMore

Memorial service for Mayada Ashraf, who was killed recently in Cairo (photo: picture-alliance/AA)

Attacks on journalists in Egypt

Caught in the crossfire

Once again, a young woman journalist has been killed in Cairo, and once again, no one is being held responsible or brought to justice. Karim El-Gawhary reports from Cairo on the case of the murdered journalist Mayada AshrafMore

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (right) speaking to Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal inside 10 Downing Street, London, England on 22 March 2011 (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK

Has Cameron buckled to pressure from Middle East allies?

During his announcement last week that he had ordered a review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK, British Prime Minister David Cameron made several references to violent extremism. Over the past two decades, Britain has introduced a whole raft of anti-terror laws that can be used in cases of violent extremism, so why is it necessary at this point in time to conduct a review into the Muslim Brotherhood? By Susannah TarbushMore

Hamed Abdel-Samad (photo: DW)

Hamed Abdel-Samad's controversial theories on Islam

Caution! Explicit Content!

Hamed Abdel-Samad's book "Der islamische Faschismus" (Islamic Fascism) is not a serious analysis, but a platitude-laden polemic against political Islam. Ironically, the book shows that its author has more in common with the people he is criticising than he realises. By Daniel BaxMore

Shocked relatives react after learning of the death sentences passed on 529 supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Mass death sentences against the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt

Egypt's future at risk

Earlier this week, an Egyptian court sentenced over 500 Muslim Brotherhood supporters to death in a case that lasted less than two days. According to Loay Mudhoon, this ruling is the work of a politicised judiciary and could destroy any chance of national reconciliationMore

Serious rioting on Tahrir Square in Cairo (photo: Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

The political consequences of the Arab Spring

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Some revolts just take longer

Civil war in Syria, a military regime in Egypt ... at first glance, it seems as if the Arab Spring has gone off the rails. But the battle is not over yet: 2014 will be a decisive year for change in the Arab world. An essay by Karim El-GawharyMore

Supporters of General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on Tahrir Square in Cairo on the third anniversary of the revolution (photo: Reuters)

The political mood in Egypt

Between a rock and a hard place

The poor turnout in the constitutional referendum last week shows that the democratic spirit that fuelled the popular uprising in Egypt in 2011 is now flagging. Writer and journalist Mansoura Ez-Eldin describes the current moodMore

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