Dossier: Power Struggle in Egypt

Supporters of Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on 3 June 2014 in Cairo (photo: Reuters)

EU election monitors in Egypt

Alienating all sides

The EU wants it both ways: it would like to retain the moral upper hand as the cradle of democracy, while at the same time maintaining good links with Egypt's new leader, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi. A commentary by Karim El-GawharyMore

Pro-Sisi and pro-Egypt products on sale in Cairo (photo: DW/B. Knight)

Presidential election in Egypt

No real choice

It is a foregone conclusion that Egypt's military ruler Abdul Fattah al-Sisi will win the first presidential election since the ousting of the Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in July 2013. Nevertheless, true democracy in the land on the Nile is still a long way off, writes Loay MudhoonMore

An Egyptian woman draped in the Egyptian flag casts her vote (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Presidential election in Egypt

The déja vu state

Hardly anyone doubts that Abdul Fattah al-Sisi will sweep to victory in Egypt's presidential election on 26 and 27 May, restoring the old, repressive Egyptian state. In this essay, Atef Botros outlines why he feels that it is questionable whether Sisi will succeed and be able to maintain his grip on power in the long term.More

General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi (photo: Reuters)

The economic power of the Egyptian army

Everything under control

While poverty and unemployment rates in Egypt are on the rise, the country's generals live comfortably and the army's businesses are booming. In fact, since the revolution, the army has managed to consolidate its economic power – with the help of foreign countries seeking to influence domestic politics in Egypt. By Markus Symank in CairoMore

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (right) speaking to Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal inside 10 Downing Street, London, England on 22 March 2011 (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK

Has Cameron buckled to pressure from Middle East allies?

During his announcement last week that he had ordered a review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK, British Prime Minister David Cameron made several references to violent extremism. Over the past two decades, Britain has introduced a whole raft of anti-terror laws that can be used in cases of violent extremism, so why is it necessary at this point in time to conduct a review into the Muslim Brotherhood? By Susannah TarbushMore

Mansoura Ez-Eldin (photo: Arian Fariborz)

Interview with the Egyptian author Mansoura Ez-Eldin

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"The current situation is untenable"

For the renowned Egyptian journalist and writer Mansoura Ez-Eldin, the revolution of 2011 provided literary fodder for essays, short stories and now a new novel. Arian Fariborz spoke with her in CairoMore

Hamed Abdel-Samad (photo: DW)

Hamed Abdel-Samad's controversial theories on Islam

Caution! Explicit Content!

Hamed Abdel-Samad's book "Der islamische Faschismus" (Islamic Fascism) is not a serious analysis, but a platitude-laden polemic against political Islam. Ironically, the book shows that its author has more in common with the people he is criticising than he realises. By Daniel BaxMore

Shocked relatives react after learning of the death sentences passed on 529 supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Mass death sentences against the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt

Egypt's future at risk

Earlier this week, an Egyptian court sentenced over 500 Muslim Brotherhood supporters to death in a case that lasted less than two days. According to Loay Mudhoon, this ruling is the work of a politicised judiciary and could destroy any chance of national reconciliationMore

Bassem Youssef (photo: Getty Images/AFP/Karim Sahib)

TV Satirist Bassem Youssef

"People should be able to listen to different opinions"

The political satire show "AlBernameg" attracted millions of Arab viewers each week before it was suddenly cancelled in November 2013. On Friday 7 February 2014, it returned to Egyptian TV screens on MBC Egypt. Jaafar Abdul-Karim and Khalid El Kaoutit spoke to its host and star, Bassem YoussefMore

Serious rioting on Tahrir Square in Cairo (photo: Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

The political consequences of the Arab Spring

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Some revolts just take longer

Civil war in Syria, a military regime in Egypt ... at first glance, it seems as if the Arab Spring has gone off the rails. But the battle is not over yet: 2014 will be a decisive year for change in the Arab world. An essay by Karim El-GawharyMore

Supporters of General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on Tahrir Square in Cairo on the third anniversary of the revolution (photo: Reuters)

The political mood in Egypt

Between a rock and a hard place

The poor turnout in the constitutional referendum last week shows that the democratic spirit that fuelled the popular uprising in Egypt in 2011 is now flagging. Writer and journalist Mansoura Ez-Eldin describes the current moodMore

Celebration of the 25th anniversary of Hamas, Nablus (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Hamas after the Overthrow in Egypt

Stuck in the Tunnel

Hamas abandoned Syria and Iran in the course of the Syrian civil war and relied on the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt as their powerful regional ally. However after Morsi was overthrown by the Egyptian military, the Palestinian organization became isolated in the region. A background report by Juliane MetzkerMore

Egypt's constituent assembly approves the country's new constitution (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Egypt's Political Outlook

In Need of a Culture of Compromise

The biggest challenge facing Egypt in its attempts to build a new future is the fact that it does not have a political culture of compromise, writes Ronald MeinardusMore

Egyptian supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi (portrait) shout slogans during a rally in support of the former Islamist leader outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on July 9, 2013 (photo: AFP/Getty Images)

Essay by Dani Rodrik

The Problem is Authoritarianism, Not Islam

Is Islam fundamentally incompatible with democracy? Time and again events compel us to ask this question. And yet it is a question that obscures more than it illuminates. An essay by Dani RodrikMore

Demonstration in commemoration of the Egyptian activist Gaber Salah, Kairo (photo: dpa)

Protestes in Egypt

Army Opponents Break Their Silence

Egypt's Islamists demonstrated for months against the army. Now, secular activists are out in the streets to protest the co-opting of their revolution. But, the military government has a propaganda machine on its side. By Markus Symank from CairoMore

Memorial for the unknown soldier in Ankara, Turkish flags in the background (photo: Tarik Tinazay/dpa)

Turkey's Foreign Policy

Return to Pragmatism

In the past month Ankara opened a membership chapter with the European Union after a 30-month hiatus, while intense diplomatic traffic is underway to end tensions with its Iranian and Iraqi neighbours. All of which is fuelling rising speculation that a major reset in Turkish foreign policy is underway. Dorian Jones looks at what lies behind the latest eventsMore

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