Dossier: Sharia

Yazidis trapped in the Sinjar mountains fleeing from IS (photo: picture-alliance/AA)

Persecution of the Yazidis in Iraq

Don't abandon us!

In Iraq, not only are the Yazidi people being persecuted by IS, their sacred sites are also being destroyed by the jihadists. The Yazidis are now responding by forming troops of fighters to protect these sites. By Joseph CroitoruMore

ISIS using a bulldozer to destroy Sunni sites in Tal Afar. Photo: justpaste.it/atrah

ISIS' cultural vandalism

A trail of destruction

Cultural barbarism prevails in the territories declared a "caliphate" by the radical Islamic group ISIS. The sad irony of this is that its members are even destroying monuments to the companions of Muhammad, whom they themselves supposedly revere. Joseph Croitoru reportsMore

The self-styled "caliph", Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Photo: YouTube

ISIS leader in Iraq

The new face of jihad?

The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) has been active in Syria for two years now. It currently has around 5,000 fighters there – and the numbers are growing. Aron Lund, who has written studies on Syria's fighter landscape for the Swedish Institute for International Affairs, explains the terrorist organisation's strategies to Mona SarkisMore

Zahra Ali (photo: private)

Book review: Zahra Ali's "Islamic Feminisms"

Female emancipation based on the spirit of Sharia

In 2012, the French sociologist Zahra Ali published a book entitled "Féminismes islamiques" (Islamic Feminisms), a compilation of ground-breaking articles by female Muslim scholars and activists from around the world. It has just been published in German translation. Claudia Kramatschek read the bookMore

Hassanal Bolkiah, Sultan of Brunei (photo: Reuters)

The introduction of Sharia in Brunei

The sultan's new laws

The tiny sultanate of Brunei is the first country in South-East Asia to officially impose Islamic Sharia law at national level. Roxana Isabel Duerr considers what this means for Brunei and the development of Islam in the regionMore

Prof Mathias Rohe (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Interview with Islam scholar and legal expert Mathias Rohe

No cultural or religious "rebates" in German courts

On 24 March 2014, a court in Wiesbaden sentenced a 23-year-old German of Afghan origin to life in prison for the murder of his pregnant ex-girlfriend. In their ruling, the judges made reference to the cultural background of the accused. Eren Güvercin spoke to legal scholar and expert on Islamic law Prof Mathias Rohe about this controversial caseMore

Pilgrims in Mecca (photo: DW/A. Abubakar)

Islamic Environmentalism

The Call to Eco-Jihad

Gradually – and unnoticed by most Muslims – Muslim intellectuals and scholars have, since the late 1960s, been developing an Islamic environmental theology. Their aim is to examine green principles such as sustainability, environmental protection, animal welfare, and biodiversity in terms of their compatibility with Islam. By Monika ZbidiMore

Junge Frauen auf der Deutschen Islam-Konferenz in Berlin 2013; Foto: picture-alliances/dpa

Muslims in Germany

Nice and Mild Sharia

Muslims should engage and transform this society. This would require them, however, to overcome the fear of being liked by some. Or is the only good Muslim a rejected Muslim? An essay by Charlotte WiedemannMore

A branch of the Bank Asya in Istanbul (photo: picture alliance/Tone Koene)

Turkey

Growing Popularity of Islamic Banks

Can religious faith, God and money ever be brought into a harmonious co-existence? Yes, they can, say the acolytes of Islamic banking. Islamic banks are becoming ever more popular in Turkey, even if not everyone is particularly enthusiastic about the development.More

A nun stands beside the burned out remains of an altar in the Franciscan School in Beni Suef (photo: DW/M. Symank)

Christians in Egypt

Persecuted and Forgotten

Anti-Christian violence is on the rise in Egypt. Although 45 churches and buildings were burned to the ground just a month ago, the Egyptian state is doing little to protect the country's Christians. By Markus SymankMore

Alaaal-Aswani (photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Interview with Egyptian Novelist Alaa al-Aswani

''Mubarak's Regime Remains Intact''

According to Egypt's renowned novelist Alaa al-Aswani, the Muslim Brothers' rule was a lesson for the country. "The idea of political Islam is now falling apart," al-Aswani asserts in this interview with Jannis Hagmann. But now, he warns, Mubarak's regime may try to take power againMore

Muhammadiyyah Muslims in Yogyakarta (photo: © SUDIARNO/AFP/Getty Images

Islam and Democracy

Why 72 Per Cent of Indonesians Want Sharia

A Pew report states that 7 out of every 10 Indonesians want sharia law to be implemented. However, says Jennie S. Bev, author and columnist from Indonesia, there is no cause for alarm, considering the semantic differences in the use of the term sharia among IndonesiansMore

Ilhan Ilkilic (photo: © DW)

Interview with Medical Ethicist Ilhan Ilkilic

Inter-religious Dialogue on Matters of Health

Ilhan Ilkilic, a doctor, medical ethicist and scholar of Islam of Turkish descent, is the first Muslim to sit on Germany's National Ethics Council and regards this institution as an experiment that can boost inter-religious dialogue within German society. He spoke to Julie SchwanneckeMore

Kristiane Backer on German TV show 'Menschen bei Maischberger' (photo: imago stock&people)

The Islamic Month of Ramadan

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A Test of Willpower

In her reflective article, Kristiane Backer describes Ramadan as not only a period of renunciation and self-discipline, but also as a process of physical and spiritual cleansing. The Islamic fasting month of gives her a sense of closer proximity to God, writes the former MTV and NBC presenter, who converted to IslamMore

An Afghan woman in Kabul (photo: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Forced Marriage in Afghanistan

Suicide as a Final Resort

Up to 80 per cent of marriages in Afghanistan take place without the consent of the bride, who is often a minor. Many of these brides – particularly those who live in cities – see killing themselves as the only way out. Waslat Hasrat-Nazimi reports on this tragic state of affairsMore

Muslim women attending an event at the University of Münster (Photo: Rolf Vennenbernd/dpa)

Muslim Women and Integration

Oppressed in the Name of Islam?

The majority of Germans regard Islam as misogynist. No other issue in the public debate on integration has evoked such bitter controversy among Germans. Nonetheless, the image of the "oppressed woman" does not correspond to the real life situation of most Muslim women. By Claudia MendeMore

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