Dossier: United Arab Emirates

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (right) speaking to Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal inside 10 Downing Street, London, England on 22 March 2011 (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK

Has Cameron buckled to pressure from Middle East allies?

During his announcement last week that he had ordered a review of the Muslim Brotherhood in the UK, British Prime Minister David Cameron made several references to violent extremism. Over the past two decades, Britain has introduced a whole raft of anti-terror laws that can be used in cases of violent extremism, so why is it necessary at this point in time to conduct a review into the Muslim Brotherhood? By Susannah TarbushMore

Anti-government protests in Ras Roman near Manama, Bahrain (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Book review: "Sectarian Gulf" by Toby Matthiesen

Sectarianism instead of revolution

The Gulf states were among the many countries enveloped by the Arab Spring. However, authorities there skilfully managed to play Sunnis and Shias off against each other as a means of dividing the protest movement. Initially, the tactic proved successful, writes Toby Matthiesen in his book "Sectarian Gulf". A review by Jannis HagmannMore

Seyed Hossein Mousavian (photo: Reuters)

Interview with Hossein Mousavian

''Iran Will Not Negotiate under Threat''

Seyed Hossein Mousavian, spokesman for the former nuclear negotiator Hassan Rowhani and once the Iranian ambassador to Germany, sees a realistic chance for a resolution of the nuclear crisis despite the escalation of the conflict. Direct talks with the USA are both possible and necessary, says the former diplomat. An interview by Silke MertinsMore

Meeting of the Gulf Cooperation Council (photo: dpa)

The Gulf Monarchies and the Arab Spring

Counter-revolution in the Gulf

Far away from the attention of Western media, the oil-rich Gulf monarchies are currently trying to avoid being hit by the wave of uprisings and revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East. So far, they have not only been successful in doing so, they've even managed to exploit the uprisings for their own purposes. Matthias Sailer reportsMore

Burj Khalifa (photo: dpa)

The Gulf States

A Hypermodern Centre of the Modern Global Economy

While in the traditional core countries of the Arab World people are rising up against stagnation, the Gulf is busy showcasing itself as the spearhead of modernisation. In his new book, Rainer Hermann writes that the Gulf States demonstrate what Arabs can accomplish when given the necessary freedomMore

Camels on a highway in Oman (photo: Sven Töniges/DW)

Cultural Change in Oman

From Camels to Classics

The Royal Opera House in Muscat, the first opera house on the Arabian Peninsula, is a symbol of the nature of the changes which have taken place in Oman. By Laura WeißmüllerMore

US Troops' withdrawal from Iraq: A column of U.S. Army Stryker armoured vehicles cross the border from Iraq into Kuwait Wednesday, 18 August 2010 (photo: AP)

Saudi Arabia's Flawed Iraq Strategy

The Iranian Wolf at the Kingdom's Door

The Saudis fear that the departure of US troops from Iraq would represent a sweeping victory for Iran, which has no military presence in Iraq, but is the strongest player there. But, says Mai Yamani in her commentary, this defeat is partly self-inflictedMore

Saudi troops (photo: dpa)

Nervousness in the Gulf

Carrot and Stick Diplomacy

Unlike much of the rest of the Arab world, the Gulf region has seen very little in the way of protests so far. Here, too, however, political relations are in flux and those in power are coming under increasing presssure to justify their role. Matthias Sailer reportsMore

Sharjah Beach (photo: dpa)

Arts and Culture in the Gulf Region

The End of Tolerance

In recent years, the United Arab Emirates have succeeded in presenting a number of prestigious arts projects and cultural events. Now though, questions are having to be asked about academic and artistic freedom there. Charlotte Bank reportsMore