Dossier: Women in the Islamic World

KAFA demonstration on International Women's Day on 8 March in Beirut (photo: Juliane Metzker)

Domestic violence against women in Lebanon

Protection, yes, but not enough

On 1 April, the Lebanese parliament approved a law designed to curb domestic violence. However, the women's rights organisation KAFA, which ran a high-profile campaign demanding a law to protect women against domestic violence, is disappointed with the outcome and says the law does not go far enough. Background information from Juliane Metzker in BeirutMore

Women in the Afghan parliament in 2013 (photo: picture alliance/dpa)

Women's rights in Afghanistan

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New Afghan law curtails women's rights

A new law in Afghanistan makes it virtually impossible to prosecute domestic violence against women. Human rights organisations have criticised the law as a massive blow to women's rights in the country. By Waslat Hasrat-NazimiMore

A girl holds up a poster of Amina al-Filali, victim of rape and forced marriage in Morocco (photo: Naqi Tbel)

Women in Morocco

Rape victims no longer forced to marry their aggressors

Although Morocco has done away with a controversial law allowing rapists of underage girls to escape prosecution if they marry their victims, the basic problem of rape remains. Activists say it's time to enact change in society to protect rape victims. By Monika GriebelerMore

Abdullah Hamidaddin wearing his daughter's abaya (photo: Abdullah Hamidaddin)

The hijab

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Power and the headscarf

Abdullah Hamidaddin, a writer and commentator on religion and the Middle East, wore his daughter's hijab to remind people that the hijab was originally an expression of power, and to point out that if women had ruled, things might have been very differentMore

The chamber of the Tunisian parliament (photo: Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

Tunisia's new constitution

The pain and joy of giving birth

It took the political parties in Tunisia two years to agree on the country's draft constitution, which was adopted on Sunday, 26 January. The resulting document, however, is as contradictory as Tunisian society itself. By Sarah MerschMore

Superheroine Kamala Khan aka Ms Marvel (photo: picture-alliance/dpa/Adrian Alphona/Marvell/Auschnitt)

Marvel comics

New Muslim superheroine

A pubescent Muslim immigrant girl in the USA endowed with super powers? Only in the wonderful world of comics! Great things are expected of the small girl from New Jersey with the large "S" on her chest. By Rachel BaigMore

Poster for the documentary film “Not Who We Are” by Carol Mansour (source: Forward Film Production)

Documentary film: "Not Who We Are"

Lost time in Lebanon

The stigma of being refugees, the lack of privacy and an uncertain future – these are just some of the problems that Syrian women face in Lebanon. The renowned filmmaker Carol Mansour tells their stories in her touching documentary "Not Who We Are". By Jannis HagmannMore

Pastor Rola Sleiman in her church in Tripoli (photo: DW/A. Williams)

Lebanon's first female pastor

"The fact that I am a woman was never a problem"

In Lebanon's northern city of Tripoli, an Evangelical community has decided to break with tradition and elect a woman as their pastor. The small parish has come to appreciate Rola Sleiman in trying times. By Andreane Williams in TripoliMore

Dr. Elham Manea (photo: private copyright)

Women in Saudi Arabia

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Caught in a System of Gender Apartheid

No professional or vocational training, no visits to the doctor, no lawsuits without male approval. The Yemeni-Swiss political scientist Elham Manea describes the plight of women in Saudi ArabiaMore

Clipping from Karim El-Gawhary's book (photo: publisher)

"Women's Power in Arabic"

Long-overdue Confrontations

In his new book, the journalist Karim El-Gawhary gives a voice and a face to strong Arab women, while moving beyond the clichés and headscarf debates. Martina Sabra describes the book as multifaceted, revealing, entertaining, emotionally moving, and definitely worth readingMore

Maya Zankoul (photo: CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Lebanese Graphic Designer Maya Zankoul

Illustrations against Ignorance and Oblivion

The young Lebanese graphic designer Maya Zankoul projects a differentiated picture of her home country in her humorous cartoons – rejecting media stereotypes of bombs, war and terror. An interview by Juliane MetzkerMore

Leila Bekhti (photo: Tiberius Film)

Sexual Repression in the Arab World

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Anguish, Love and Poetry

The film "The Source" tells the story of women living in a North African village who enter into a "love strike" because they are fed up with doing all the work. In conversation with Paul Katzenberger, director Radu Mihăileanu talks about marital rape, parallels with the West and the poetic qualities of the Arabic language. By Paul KatzenbergerMore

Still from Mona E-Naggar's 'Istislam' (photo: Mona El-Naggar)

Mona El-Naggar on Her Film "Istislam"

Close-Up on the Muslim Brotherhood's Grassroots Work

Mona El-Naggar's documentary "Submission" offers an astonishingly close look at how the long-time secret organization conveys its ideology at the grassroots level and among Egypt's youth in particular. An interview with the film's director, Mona El-Naggar, by Martina SabraMore

Information evening on genital mulitation at the Coptic Center for Training and Development, an NGO in Beni Sueif (photo: Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images)

Genital Mutilation in Egypt

Control over Female Sexuality

Egypt is the only country in North Africa where the practise of female genital mutilation remains widespread – despite an official ban and many public information campaigns for women. Anna Kölling reports from CairoMore

Film Poster Burka Avenger (Source: picture-alliance/AP)

"Burka Avenger"

Pakistan's Female Muslim Superhero

A burqa-wearing superhero? The first episode of Haroon Rashid's animated "Burka Avenger" has been shown in Pakistan. The creator of the series says he wanted to create a role model for girls in his country. Rachel Baig reportsMore

Street children in the restaurant Sésame Garden in Marrakesch (photo: Astrid Kaminski)

Street Children in Marrakech

The Oasis of Sésame Garden

Some 10 million tourists visit the Kingdom of Morocco every year. But very little of the income they generate trickles down to the socially disadvantaged. In Marrakech, a lone restaurateur is making a real difference to the lives of street children. A report Astrid KaminskiMore

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