Society

The hand of a dead person peeps out from beneath a sheet (photo: Christoph Bangert)

Book review: Christoph Bangert's "War Porn"

We must not look away

The simple, unassuming cover of this book belies its explosive content: in his latest photobook, "War Porn", photojournalist Christoph Bangert shows the true, ugly face of conflict in all its horror. He presents the reader with an unfiltered selection of images from his photographic archive, documenting the brutality of war, predominantly in the Arab world. By Felix KoltermannMore

A boy salvages belongings from a burned-down building in Htan Kone village in Myanmar's northern Sagaing region on 25 August 2013 (photo: Reuters)

Anti-Muslim violence in Myanmar and Sri Lanka

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Surge of radical Buddhism in South Asia

Nationalist Buddhist monks in Myanmar and Sri Lanka are playing a key role in instigating hatred and provoking violence towards the Muslim minorities in both countries, claiming that such action is necessary in order to protect Buddhist race and culture. By Roma Rajpal WeißMore

Gilles Kepel (photo: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

Interview with the French Islam expert Gilles Kepel

Passion and suffering

For three decades now, the renowned French sociologist and political scientist Gilles Kepel has been monitoring the development of Muslim societies. He sees a close connection between the developments in the French suburbs and the events in the Arab world. Beat Stauffer spoke to him in ParisMore

Yazidis trapped in the Sinjar mountains fleeing from IS (photo: picture-alliance/AA)

Persecution of the Yazidis in Iraq

Don't abandon us!

In Iraq, not only are the Yazidi people being persecuted by IS, their sacred sites are also being destroyed by the jihadists. The Yazidis are now responding by forming troops of fighters to protect these sites. By Joseph CroitoruMore

Christoph Bangert (photo: private)

Interview with war photographer Christoph Bangert

The naked brutality of war

The photographer and journalist Christoph Bangert has published a book of photographs that his editors refused to use. All of them highlight the horror of war. His book, "War Porn", is an appeal not to look away from the brutality of armed conflict. Monika Griebeler spoke to him about his work and his bookMore

Arabic calligraphy (photo: picture-alliance/Tone Koene)

The Arabic language

A better understanding

Arabic is spoken in 22 countries, but people from different countries don't necessarily understand each other. The language is split up into numerous dialects, some of which are mutually unintelligible. The Arab spring went a long way towards unifying the way Arabic is used in everyday life. Translators are working on an online dictionary to help standardise the language for business purposes. By Charlotte Schmitz and Guido ZebischMore

A despondent man with his head in his hands (photo: Iris Mostegel)

Trauma therapy for victims of violence in Arab countries

Tortured, humiliated and voiceless

Traumatised victims of violence and war in Arab countries are now finding psychological help in Germany. The unusual thing about the therapy is that their therapists never see their faces; sessions take place anonymously over the Internet. By Iris MostegelMore

Rabeya Müller (photo: Ulrike Hummel)

Portrait of the theologian Rabeya Müller

Equality in the name of Islam

The women's movement within Islam is gaining momentum worldwide. One of the most influential German Muslim women in this respect is the theologian Rabeya Müller. With her clear views and breaks with taboo, she is pushing for change within the Muslim community in GermanyMore

Scene from the play "Supermaenner" at the Theater Ballhaus Naunynstraße, Berlin (photo: Ballhaus Naunynstraße)

The emancipation of men with Turkish roots

A closed society viewed from inside

Men in Germany with Turkish roots are starting to break their silence and talk about their problems and how to overcome them in self-help groups and on stage. These "Supermen" have also now made their debut in Turkish literature. By Astrid KaminskiMore

Women in Libya

High hopes brutally dashed

The 2011 revolution raised Libyan women's hopes that they could in future play a more active role in society and politics, leading to the establishment of many women's rights groups. However, the militias' power games and ongoing violence are putting the progress achieved thus far at risk. By Valerie StockerMore

Dr. Mads Gilbert tends to a child in al-Shifa Hospital, Gaza, 2009 (photo Getty Images)

Interview with Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert

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"Nobody is safe in Gaza"

Professor of Medicine at the University of Tromso, Norway, Mads Gilbert is currently working at al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza. He has been volunteering in Gaza on and off for the last 17 years and recently submitted a report to the UN on the state of the health sector in Gaza. In this interview with Roma Rajpal Weiss, Gilbert describes the present situation at the hospital and in GazaMore

Inside the El Ghriba synagogue in Tunisia (photo: dpa)

The Jewish community in Tunisia

"Everything is ok; we don't have any problems"

Once numbering over one hundred thousand, Tunisia's Jewish community has dwindled over the years. Its members practice discretion, but certainly have no desire to hide. By Sarah Mersch in TunisiaMore

Still from an ISIS propaganda video (photo: picture-alliance/abaca)

ISIS propaganda and use of social networks

The online jihad

The terrorist group ISIS (which now refers to itself as Islamic State) has been conducting a massive propaganda campaign via social networks on the Internet. In addition to intimidating opponents, the group wants to establish its own media brand. By Nastassja SteudelMore

Portrait of the last Ottoman Caliph, Abdulmecid II. Photo: Library of Congress

History of the Caliphate

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We are all caliphs!

The history of the Caliphate is, with a few exceptions, an unstable and unhappy one. In this essay, Stefan Weidner explains why the self-appointed caliphs of today, like the ISIS leader in Iraq, have little in common with the caliphs of oldMore

Breaking the fast in Brazil's "Islamic heartland", Recife. Photo: Ekrem Güzeldere

Ramadan in Brazil

Maintaining the tradition

The small Muslim community in the Brazilian metropolis Recife meets every evening in the city's only Muslim centre to break their fast with the iftar dinner. Most of the people in the community are African immigrants. Ekrem Güzeldere reportsMore

Activists attend a silent protest march against a recent rape case in Calcutta, India, 15 June 2013. Photo: EPA/Piyal Adhikary

India's rape problem

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New rape laws must be implemented

A series of brutal gang rapes in India has once again highlighted the rampant problem of violence against women in the country. Despite recent law reforms and harsher penalties, little is being done by the authorities to prevent crimes against women. By Roma Rajpal WeissMore

Interior of the dome of the mosque in Jundiaì. Photo: Ekrem Güzeldere

Muslims in Brazil

A culturally vibrant minority

Brazil has a very small Muslim population, but it is one with a long history. The ancestors of many of today's Brazilian Muslims arrived in successive waves of immigration from Africa and Europe, later also from Syria and Lebanon. As Ekrem Güzeldere discovered, they are now a well-integrated minorityMore

Two Muslim students in headscarves in the audience at a public event at a university. Photo: dpa

France's burka ban

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Excluding the wrong people

We shouldn't be arguing about burkas: we should be abolishing the headscarf bans. They ostracise women who could be building bridges, comments Ursula RüssmannMore

German footballers Lukas Podolski (l.), Mesut Özil, Sami Khedira and Per Mertesacker. Photo: picture-alliance/augenklick/firo Sportphoto

Soccer as a force for integration

Success through diversity

Mesut Özil and his team colleagues not only represent multicultural Germany: they also serve as popular role models within German society. This shows that football should be afforded greater recognition as a force for integration, says Shohreh KarimianMore

Rohingya refugees from Myanmar. Photo: DW/Shaikh Azizur Rahman

The Muslim Rohingya in Myanmar

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In the shadow of an icon

Since 2012 there have been repeated violent clashes between Buddhists and Muslims in Myanmar. Human rights activists accuse the government and state security forces of ethnic cleansing, murder and persecution. Charlotte Wiedemann reports on the fate of the country's Muslim Rohingya peopleMore

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