Dossier: Immigration

Children playing in the kindergarten for traumatised children in Manshia, Syria (photo: Laura Overmeyer)

Syrian refugee children

A lost generation in the making

In the Jordanian village of Manshia, a German NGO has set up a kindergarten for traumatised Syrian refugee children. Here, they can leave their horrible past behind and learn how to be children again. Laura Overmeyer visited the kindergartenMore

Two young Muslim women attend a ceremony at the Westfälische Wilhelms University in Münster in October 2012 (photo: dpa/picture-alliance)

Integration in Germany

Finally growing up

Attitudes and approaches to integration in Germany have changed a lot over the past 20 years. During this period, Germany has gone from a denial that it is a country of immigration to a concerted effort to improve integration. Aladin El-Mafaalani takes a closer look at what has changedMore

Poster for the "Yes" campaign in the recent referendum on immigration in Switzerland (photo: picture-alliance/dpa)

Swiss referendum on immigration

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The Swiss against the world

According to Robert Misik, Xenophobia was just one of the reasons why 50.3% of those who voted in Switzerland's recent referendum on immigration back strict quotas for immigration from European Union countries; a provincial mentality and anti-EU sentiment also played a roleMore

An unemployed, illegal immigrant from Nigeria in Rabat, Morocco, 15 November 2013 (photo: DW/A. Boukhems)

Migration in Morocco

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From emigration to immigration

For decades, migration in Morocco flowed in one direction: towards Europe. Now, however, while fewer and fewer Moroccans are leaving the country, immigration is on the rise. For the first time, illegal immigrants living in the country are to be issued with residence papers. By Beat StaufferMore

African migrants in the Short Stay Immigrant Centre in the Spanish enclave Melilla, Morocco (photo: Getty Images)

The EU's Migration and Asylum Policy

Not in Line with European Values

Right-wing populists like to issue dire warnings of a flood of migration that is about to overwhelm Germany. But the EU Commission's figures clearly refute this perception: only four per cent of all people living in the EU are third-country nationals. By Elif Cindik and Louisa PehleMore