France pledges 60 million euros in support for Sudan's new government

18.09.2019

France has offered to support the newly formed transitional government of Sudan with a grant of 60 million euros (66 million dollars), 15 million of which would be paid immediately, according to the French foreign minister.

"We are in a new Sudan, a Sudan which is at a key moment in its history and France is at the side of this new Sudan," Jean-Yves Le Drian told reporters late on Monday, saying France had admired the peaceful protests that ousted president Omar al-Bashir in April.

He said French authorities were offering to help Sudan re-build relations with international lenders and tackle its foreign debt.

Earlier this month, the country's first Cabinet was sworn in since the overthrow of al-Bashir after mass protests.

In the wake of al-Bashir's replacement by a transitional military council, protesters had continued to call for civilian rule, which the military responded to with a clampdown. 

The new government was established as part of a power-sharing agreement between the military and pro-democracy demonstrators. 

The African Union responded to news of the new Cabinet by lifting sanctions that had been imposed on Sudan in June after the crackdown on the pro-democracy demonstrations.

Al-Bashir, who ruled the country in north-east Africa for 30 years with an iron fist, is currently being tried for corruption after he was found to be in possession of large sums of local and foreign currency, as well as other assets, without legal justification.    (dpa)

 

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