I don't want to be forced to emigrate

I really don't know what to think. On the one hand, when Muslim friends who wear headscarves are abused on the streets, just because of the way they look, then I can say I have very little regard for this country. When things like that happen, I would like to move somewhere else, somewhere where everybody, irrespective of colour, background or religion can live peacefully side by side.

Burcu studies communication research in Erfurt (photo: private)
"I would hope that the country I emigrated to would be one that invests in education, so that things like gratuitous feelings of national pride or superiority are not an issue. It is hard to believe that we are still fighting racism in the 21st century," comments Burcu

Maybe Canada would be a possibility. In any case, I would hope that the country I emigrated to would be one that invests in education, so that things like gratuitous feelings of national pride or superiority are not an issue. It is hard to believe that we are still fighting racism in the 21st century.

And I don't mean just the right-wing extremists; I mean the racism of the Muslim extremists too, and the racism of "foreigners". At the same time, I don't want to be forced to emigrate. I, too, am Germany. I feel that this is my home, despite my Turkish background. In the end, I think that we should all stay in the country and tackle the problem at its roots. We can't allow things to go too far. (Burcu Sargin, 24, studies communication research in Erfurt)

 

When is it enough?

Germany is my home, and home is a place where you should feel at ease. At the moment, though, I don't feel that way.

Tugba studies law in Hamburg (photo: private)
"The question is, when should I say enough is enough? When the AfD has seats in the Bundestag? When one can no longer walk the streets without fear?" asks Tugba

The current climate in Germany is frightening and it is not getting any better. Just the opposite. There are people out there who don't like me and don't want me here, just because I am a Muslim.

The country I grew up in doesn't give me the opportunities it gives to others. I want to help Germany get through this phase, so we can learn and grow as a society. The question is, when should I say enough is enough? When the AfD has seats in the Bundestag? When one can no longer walk the streets without fear? I don't know.Sometimes I think about whether I would prefer to be somewhere else, whether I would feel better elsewhere.

I could go to Turkey, perhaps, because I can speak the language. I could work there as a lawyer. Or maybe go back to university to take a master's degree. Whether or not I could live there for good is another question. Turkey has problems of its own. But at least I could live there without fear and not have to keep proving myself. (Tugba Uyanik, 24, studies law in Hamburg)

 

I see myself as a multiplier

Germany needs to have demographic diversity. If I decide to emigrate then it will be because of a job. Germans, whether they a migration background or not, should take the AfD's electoral success as motivation to spur them on, to develop a more trusting and responsible relationship towards one another. I would like to see a feeling of unity emerging that pays no regard to religion, colour or ethnic background.

Yavuz studies industrial engineering in Bochum (photo: private)
"I see myself as a multiplier, someone who can take on a political, economic and linguistic bridging function. I would be very reluctant to leave Germany at present," admits Yavuz

In countries like Singapore and Canada there is a very different sense of belonging and identity.

We need to have more communication – and that includes with AfD voters. I see myself as a multiplier, someone who can take on a political, economic and linguistic bridging function. So I would be very reluctant to leave Germany at present. (Yavuz Dogan, 26, studies industrial engineering in Bochum)

© taz 2016

 

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