Soon after Sundayʹs announcement in Tehran, nearly all the European foreign ministries had announced their concerns and warned Iran against violating the nuclear agreement. In other words, Europe can do little more than repeat that it wants to keep the agreement alive.

Clinically dead

Since the USA's withdrawal, however, this agreement is clinically dead, at least for Iran. And the historically unprecedented U.S. sanctions have turned it into a worthless piece of paper. Ultimatums, sanctions and worried faces are the diplomacy of our days. How far are we going to go, where is this going to end? Read Twitter, if you want to know where the world is heading, the maxim seems to have become – and don't just read Trump's tweets, where he announced two weeks ago that he had called off an attack on Iran just ten minutes earlier.

The regime in Tehran also uses Twitter to conduct its own brand of diplomacy: "We have already overthrown a president once, we can do it again. If Trump listens to Pompeo, we can assure him that he will remain a one-term president. If he listens to Truck Carlson, however, there may be another option." What does this tweet tell us? Is it a warning, a cry for help, or an offer? It comes from Hessamodin Ashna, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani's closest advisor. The 55-year-old runs a centre for strategic studies, which Rouhani himself founded years ago. Ashna is a clergyman who discarded his clerical garb some two years ago and is very active in social networks.

Hostage-taking or willingness to talk?

Hostages at the American Embassy in Tehran in 1979 (photo: Fars)
A national trauma – the U.S. hostage crisis in Tehran in 1979: if Trump listens to his foreign minister, Mike Pompeo, who favours a hard line against Iran, then what happened to Jimmy Carter will happen to the incumbent president. Carter's presidency coincided with the Islamic revolution and the hostage-taking of U.S. diplomats in Tehran. The latter dominated the U.S. presidential election campaign: Carter lost and became the "one-term president": the hostages were released exactly on the day his successor Ronald Reagan took his oath of office

What does his latest tweet tell us? If Trump listens to his foreign minister, Mike Pompeo, who favours a hard line against Iran, then what happened to Jimmy Carter will happen to the incumbent president. Carter's presidency coincided with the Islamic revolution and the hostage-taking of U.S. diplomats in Tehran. The latter dominated the U.S. presidential election campaign: Carter lost and became the "one-term president": the hostages were released exactly on the day his successor Ronald Reagan took his oath of office. But if Trump listens to Truck Carlson, his favourite host at Fox News, Iran and the U.S. could do business. Carlson spoke out vehemently against war on the day the attack against Iran was due to start. This is said to have prompted Trump to change his decision.

What is the Iranian presidential advisor trying to tell Trump? Is Iran planning something like the hostage-taking of U.S. diplomats? Or is he offering willingness to talk if the U.S. refrains from an attack? Or is it nothing more than the usual analysis – that Trump will lose the next presidential election if he becomes involved in a war with Iran?

There's no such thing as a short war

Be that as it may, Trump tweeted afterwards that an attack against Iran would not be a normal war, but a short and very painful operation. And the Iranian Foreign Minister twittered back: "There will not be a short war. Trump might start a war, but he won't be the one to end it." Neither side seems to have a plan.

What is certain, however, is that American sanctions are increasingly impacting the everyday lives of Iranians. Fifty percent of the population live below the official poverty line, a parliamentary commission that deals with social issues stated three weeks ago.

These poor people should not, however, be tempted to rebel against their rulers, which is no doubt what Trump would like to see them do. After all, Khamenei recently replaced the leading commanders of the Revolutionary Guards and the Basidj, the people's militias.

The new appointees have recognised the signs of the times and, on taking office, pledged to destroy any plans Trump may have inside Iran. In other words, any future protests will be seen as collaborating with the enemy.

Ali Sadrzadeh

© Iran Journal 2019

 

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