In Western Europe and the USA, the movement focuses on the social advancement of disadvantaged people and interfaith dialogue with Christians and Jews, Balci reports. According to him, supporters often conceal their link to Gulen. In the Caucasus and in Africa, Gulen supporters have founded businesses and taken part in economic cooperation. The AKP has also made use of these contacts. Between 2002 and 2013, the number of Turkish embassies in Africa grew from 19 to 34. "Gulen supporters were the vanguard of Turkey's soft-power offensive," Balci explains.

The investigative journalist Ahmet Sik describes these activities as the "civil face" of the movement, which serves as a façade for its militaristic nature. This suspicion was borne out for the first time during the so-called Ergenekon trials. In 2007, Turkish prosecutors loyal to Gulen accused hundreds of former military officers, opposition lawmakers, journalists and attorneys of belonging to a secret organisation that supposedly wanted to overthrow the government. "With falsified evidence and false statements, they made life hell for thousands of people," Sik says. He himself was arrested in 2011, shortly before the publication of his book, "The Imam's Army", which describes the infiltration of the security apparatus. "This is a mafia that is using religion as an instrument to gain power. It functions like a secret service," Sik says of the movement's cult-like structure.

Ahmet Sik (photo: picture-alliance/AP Photo/C. Erok)
During the so-called Ergenekon trials in 2007, Turkish prosecutors loyal to Gulen accused hundreds of former military officers, opposition lawmakers, journalists and attorneys of belonging to a secret organisation that supposedly wanted to overthrow the government. Journalist Ahmet Sik (pictured here) was arrested in 2011, shortly before the publication of his book, "The Imam's Army", which describes the infiltration of the security apparatus by the Gulen movement

A new "deep state"

In 2010, WikiLeaks released internal e-mails from Stratfor, a US-based security consultancy. The e-mails support this claim, quoting informants from the movement who describe clear hierarchies and chains of command as well as the "recruiting process" at Gulen schools. "The most loyal students were carefully placed in important positions in the government, while the most talented were sent to the military academy," the e-mails reveal. 

Early on, Gulen himself had described his supporters as "recruits". They came first and foremost from Turkey, of course, but also from the dormitories, called "houses of light", that the movement established in the West, including in the USA and Germany.

The American magazine Foreign Policy reported as early as 2010 that although the Turkish government managed to curb the power of the military, a new "deep state" had emerged. Erdogan recognised it as such and accused the special courts, which were full of Gulen's cadre, of operating as a "state within a state".

Fuelled by panic and the realisation that the Gulen movement – to which an estimated 10 to 15 per cent of Turkey's population belong – had gained too much power, Erdogan announced in November 2013 that he was closing the movement's tutoring centres. Just one month later, on 17 December, the public prosecutor's office, which had close ties to Gulen, started a comprehensive corruption investigation into Erdogan and his associates. 

Shortly after, President Erdogan renamed the movement the Fethullahist Terror Organisation and declared that Gulen was the public enemy number one. Tens of thousands of public prosecutors and police officers were fired or transferred. Gulen institutions and media companies were closed or taken over by the state.

Turks celebrate the failure of the attempted coup in July 2016 (photo: picture-alliance/abaca/O. Gurdogan)
Fethullah Gulen is now public enemy No. 1 in Turkey, held responsible for the failed coup of July 2016. However, Gareth Jenkins of the Swedish Institute for Security and Development Policy considers it unlikely that Gulen himself directed the entire operation. According to Timur Tinc, "he does not believe there is any evidence for that theory and questions whether Gulen even knew about the coup in advance." Pictured here: Turks celebrate the failure of the attempted coup in July 2016

Masterminds of the coup?

The conflict between President Erdogan and the Gulen movement ultimately escalated in the failed coup attempt of 15 July 2016, during which over 250 people died and 2,200 were wounded. Just hours later, the AKP government stated that Gulenists were behind it. 

Journalist Ahmet Sik sees things a little differently: "I think that there was a faction within the military and that the Gulenists were among the masterminds. However, I believe that members of the faction betrayed each other the night before the attempted coup and during the events that followed." He says that the secret service knew of the plans by 3 p.m. and was able to take appropriate precautions and negotiate with parts of the faction.

Gareth Jenkins of the Swedish Institute for Security and Development Policy sees things in a similar light. He thinks that Gulenist officers probably got wind of the next purge of the security apparatus and wanted to head it off with a coup. Jenkins considers it unlikely that Gulen himself directed the entire operation. He does not believe there is any evidence for that theory and questions whether Gulen even knew about the coup in advance.

Erdogan called the coup "a gift from God" and declared a state of emergency. Because of their alleged ties to the Gulen movement, he ordered 150,000 persons suspended or fired from the military, the justice system and the education sector. More than 50,000 people were arrested. By as early as October 2016, around 4,500 companies and institutions had been nationalised. 

Over 300 companies – including Kaynak Holding – worth almost €12 billion were taken over by Turkey's banking supervisory authority and used to fill the state coffers. Opposition leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu from the Kemalist CHP called the government's actions a "civil coup".

The Turkish government also managed to exert pressure on the foreign countries where the Gulen movement is active. In 19 of the 36 African countries where the movement has a presence, the Turkish government has succeeded in taking over Gulen schools through the state-funded Maarif Foundation, which was established in October 2016. Nevertheless, the US rebuffed Turkey's request to extradite Gulen. Germany's Federal Government also refuses to extradite Gulen supporters who fled to Germany after the attempted coup.

Timur Tinc

© Development and Cooperation 2017

Timur Tinc is a reporter for the daily newspaper Frankfurter Rundschau.

More on this topic
In submitting this comment, the reader accepts the following terms and conditions: Qantara.de reserves the right to edit or delete comments or not to publish them. This applies in particular to defamatory, racist, personal, or irrelevant comments or comments written in dialects or languages other than English. Comments submitted by readers using fantasy names or intentionally false names will not be published. Qantara.de will not provide information on the telephone. Readers' comments can be found by Google and other search engines.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.

Comments for this article: Creating an elite to lead the state

I have many concerns on Timur Tinc's article on the Hizmet Movement and Gulenists.
First, Timur Tinc is a fresh name I have heard. I am not sure whether he really met with Gulenists and visited any of their institutions. I think he tried to write on an issue he never knew exactly and correctly. He has asked a few experts but all are critics and dissidents of Gulen movement. None from the Gulen movement including academics, journolists he spoke to. Besides, Ahmet Sik, a prominent Turkish journalists, Timur wrote his article mainly on his views, is now jailed by Akp for more than one year, and was jailed again by Akp a few years ago but this was presented as it was Gulenist people made him jailed, not Akp. Maybe after his release, Ahmet might change his mind about Gulen movement. These thoughts are from his former approach. Finally the first picture was announced as Akp supporters in anti-Hizmet march is a big lie. They are not Akp suppporters but also Akp dissidents.
Qantara must not publish such jerk and inaccurate, non-objective articles.....

Mustafa Bursali02.01.2018 | 13:45 Uhr

"Gulen movement is not good". Yes this is the message of the article and the "belief" of the author.

The rest is to try to justify this belief with distant, discord, and distorted cherry picked comments.

There are tons of articles and experts including from USA and EU, however the authors only selected a few that have

opposing claims. The article is not scientific, is written as a baseless comments to try to justify the belief of the author.

It is our right to demand an article free of prejudice and false and unproved claims. It is also important to note, Why

on the earth there was not a single positive sentence about the movement. Every single sentence leads to distorted

realities. In its mildest term, this is a very naive and biased article written by a gulen hater!

Please help publish unbiased, scientific, based-on proven facts articles.

Thanks,

Hasan Dent03.01.2018 | 22:26 Uhr

Why my previous comment was not published? What is the policy not to publish comments?

Hasan Dent04.01.2018 | 00:37 Uhr