Muslim communities ″unlike others in Britain″, former race equality chief Trevor Phillips says

12.04.2016

Trevor Phillips, who was the chairman of the Equality and Human rights Commission between 2003 and 2012, told the Policy Exchange think tank ″it was disrespectful to suppose that Muslim communities would change,″ reported The Times.

Mr Phillips said: ″Continuously pretending that a group is somehow eventually going to become like the rest of us is perhaps the deepest form of disrespect.″ He went on to claim that we should accept that Muslims ″see the world differently from the rest of us.″

Mr Phillips said part of the integration process was for ″the rest of us to grasp that people aren′t going to change their views simply because we are constantly telling them that basically they should be like us.′

His claims come just a few days after David Cameron announced people who do not pass an English test cannot stay in Britain, in a bid to close the cultural gap and bring those on the fringes of society into the mainstream.

The Prime Minster linked a failure to integrate into British society to an increased risk of terrorism.

Muslims make up five percent of the UK′s population, with around 2.7 million currently living in Britain.    (The Independent)

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